Part 12, State Solar Series: Florida Expert Says “Wake Up” to Massive Potential

Part 12, State Solar Series: Florida Expert Says “Wake Up” to Massive Potential

[tps_header]

The Sunshine State isn’t very bright when it comes to solar policy, and homebuyers are starting to demand a change.

TecHome Builder’s new solar series takes it state-by-state to provide you with a better grasp on the current solar market, including current laws and advice from builders on how to overcome obstacles.

Part 12 of our series heads to Florida, where we speak to renewable energy consultant Scott McIntyre of Tampa-based Solar Energy Management.

“Florida is fourteenth in the country in utilization of solar power, and east of the Mississippi, it receives more radiant energy than any other state … Florida is just starting to wake up a little bit,” says McIntyre. 

McIntyre has been following state solar trends closely and sees an uptick in homebuyer awareness and interest due to federal financial incentives.

Texas is another state that represents a high potential for solar power but, due to multiple factors, has neglected a comprehensive solar policy. TecHome covered the Lone Star state earlier in the series, and you can read more to see similarities between these two states.

RELATED: Solar Solution Could Offer 20 Times the Power

SCROLL: Florida’s Unique and Complicated Solar Energy Market

[/tps_header]

[tps_title] Florida Energy Markets [/tps_title]

Florida is comprised of a complicated energy market of nuclear and natural gas.
Florida is comprised of a complicated energy market of nuclear and natural gas.

Energy Market

In 2015, Florida was second only to Texas in terms of net electricity generation, the third in the nation for electricity consumption and with higher-than-average electricity rates. However, the state isn’t turning to renewable energy to alleviate these high monthly costs.

According to the EIA report on Florida, renewable energy sources only accounted for 2.3 percent of the state’s net electricity generation, and the majority of that renewable energy, around 90 percent, came from biomass, not wind and solar.

Instead, Florida receives the bulk of its energy from nuclear power, coal-fired power plants and natural gas fields.

Pages: 1 2 3

About The Author

Michael Black is a staff writer and content coordinator at TecHome Builder. He has a particular interest in new solar developments and smart energy systems and is always looking for the next smart home trend to cover. As the youngest member of the TecHome team, Michael brings a passion that keeps the team energized. He also is instrumental in leading our social media efforts.

Related posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *