Social Media’s Impact on Automation, AI and Future Homes

Could Facebook be silently changing the industry?Could Facebook be silently changing the industry?

There are 1.13 billion daily active users on Facebook and an average of 40,000 search requests executed on Google per second—a total of 3.5 billion searches daily.

How will these statistics have an impact on the connected home of tomorrow? The answer may surprise you.

The major players of online engagement and commerce have silently been infiltrating the home technology industry, through data collection, for most of the 21st century. As this continues to develop, online platforms will start to merge with the advancement of home automation—a space where voice control solutions are currently dominating.

“However, voice control is going to have a short shelf life, since the next thing is coming fast and has already been seen,” argues Joe Whitaker, founder of The Thoughtful Home.

RELATED: Voice Control at CEDIA 2016

What exactly is the next big thing, and where has it been seen? Whitaker points to a tiny booth that was present at this year’s CEDIA, where a start-up called Josh.ai made waves and impressed attendees.

The Josh.ai platform is leading the charge for the next wave of automation and artificial intelligence.
The Josh.ai platform is leading the charge in the next wave of automation and artificial intelligence.

“Josh.ai is the only thing to arrive that offers some realm of artificial intelligence,” says Whitaker. “And that’s because it has a level of habitually-based programming to it.”

We will have more on the Josh.ai platform, coming soon. Stay tuned!

Homes Will Learn our Wants and Needs

Habitually-based automation is the next big thing, where behavior algorithms learn homeowners’ daily routines, desires and preferences towards living the most comfortable, convenient life possible.

“CEDIA has this slogan that goes ‘Lives Lived Best at Home.’ But now, it’s a lot more widespread. Lives can be lived best anywhere. In anything. Doing anything,” says Whitaker.

The first step to this is artificial intelligence and algorithmic learning, which Josh.ai offers in its platform. Habitually-based learning transcends to the next level by combining these platforms with other outlets already prevalent in the majority of homeowners’ lives.

Whitaker points to three major names—Facebook, Google and Amazon.

What will come out on top?
What will come out on top?

Partnerships Will Drive the Future

Whitaker believes the “writing is already on the wall” for the entire industry when it comes to behavior learning in smart homes, since so much is already available via these entities. To transform the industry, a smart home company will need to make the initial push and tap into Facebook, Google or Amazon—three of the biggest resources of data out there.

“When that happens, it is game over for most control companies,” says Whitaker.

However, this concept will also need to go beyond data mining and artificial intelligence. For lives to truly be “Best Lived Anywhere,” all components of the smart home industry will need to work together to achieve this promise.

Tesla has done it with Nest. Savant has done it with its builder channel. And Amazon Alexa continues to do it with any company willing to connect with its open API. These partnerships will drive the future of the connected home.

“All these disparate organisms in electronics are starting to work together,” says Whitaker. “That, ultimately, is what will lead the next big thing.”

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About The Author

Greg Vellante is a staff writer and multimedia specialist at TecHome Builder, as well as a content coordinator for AE Ventures events. He has over a decade of experience writing for various publications on topics that range from cinema to editorials to home technology. His favorite technologies fall into the A/V and home entertainment realm, and he’s keeping a close eye on the rising trends in robotics and virtual/augmented reality. Greg resides in Boston, holds a degree in Media Studies from Emerson College and pursues screenwriting/filmmaking in his free time.

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